STEM Careers: Java Developer

Viswanath Guntupalli

Viswanath Guntupalli

Java Developer for Healthcare Management Systems in Nashville, TN

Graduated from Western Kentucky University

How did you become interested in technology, particularly software development?

I’ve been interested in technology since I was 12 years old. That was the first time I got to play with a computer and soon I was amazed at the way it works. My interest in programming started a little later, probably when I was 15. That was the first time I was taught basic programming and I knew that very moment that it was my cup of tea. I liked the fact that you could write your own programs to make them do whatever you wanted to do. I also found programming challenging and I liked the idea of being challenged by a problem and the fact that you could solve it by writing programs in several different ways. As I grew older my passion toward programming also grew with me. The more I learned about computer science, the more interested I became in it.

The future of our country lies with today’s youth as they become tomorrow’s citizens.

Tell us about your job and what it is you do for Healthcare Management Systems.

I work as a Java developer at Healthcare Management Systems. We here at HMS develop the software that is used at hospitals by doctors and nurses to better manage their patients. Right now I am part of a team that is working on building a component of software which tracks the allergies, problems and medication history of a patient and presents it to the doctor. As a developer, I’m working on the look and feel of the software (called graphical user interface) and my goal is to develop screens which have good ease of use and a pleasing look.

Why is it important to the future of this country to get more students interested in technology?

The United States is the epicenter of technology of this world. All the greatest inventions and discoveries in the history of mankind have been made on this great land, most of the software companies which define the shape of technology in the present age have been founded here. Given the present day scenario where we face a lot of competition from several growing countries across the globe, it is really important for us as a country to keep our technological edge.

To keep the United States on the top of technology we have to show more interest in innovation and technology. The future of our country lies with today’s youth as they become tomorrow’s citizens. If we have more students studying science and technology, the USA will become more progressive in the field of technology. Also, it is projected that all future jobs will be related to technology by the year 2020. The USA will fall short because hundreds of thousands of people will lack the necessary technological skills. We should show more interest in science by investing in today’s students and also attracting the most talented students across the globe.

What is the professional goal of a Java developer like yourself?

As a Java developer who just started his career, I see myself in a lead role in few years. My professional goal is to become a Java architect who outlays the solution for complex software problems.

What do you think would help get students more interested in software development at a younger age?

To be more interested in software development at a later stage, students must show interest in mathematics in their foundation years. Software development or programming is directly related to mathematics; to have good programming skills you must have good mathematical problem solving abilities. Students must show interest in math and work hard to become good at math, which would lay the route for them to become good programmers.

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