Mediaplanet STEM Education Report

This is from a press release created by Mediaplanet.

Summer is [here] for many students, but educators, industry experts, and parents, still have education at the top of their minds. With some of the largest names in the industry aligning, Mediaplanet [has published] a STEM Education campaign within the Washington Post to inspire and educate readers on the importance of focusing attention on STEM education.  The report will be distributed to over one million readers within the Wednesday edition of the Washington Post with the support of 100k in 10, STEMconnector, Women@NASA, the National Science Teachers Association, leading doctors, and many other industry experts.

“Too many of our country’s children never get the science, technology, engineering, or math (STEM) learning they need to become the problem solvers of tomorrow,” Talia Milgrom-Elcott Program Officer, Urban Education ; Sr. Manager, STEM Teacher Initiatives Carnegie Corporation of New York, states in the publication’s foreword. Deborah S. Jin , NIST Physicist, JILA Fellow, Professor of Physics, CU, L’Oreal – UNESCO goes on to say, “Investing in STEM education will ensure that we will have a scientifically literate society in the future that is able to make intelligent choices about global societal challenges such as energy, climate change, and disease.” Mediaplanet is proud to support students, teachers, and industry leaders to pursue and advance the STEM education, and hopes that through this publication, readers will further follow the demanding careers, that we as a country so desperately need.

Through the publication, readers will learn more about topics like:

  • Women and Girls in STEM
  • Exercising creativity through robotics
  • Careers in IT
  • Adding the Arts to the STEM Equation
  • Increasing interest in STEM K-12
  • Workforce Demands for STEM Careers
  • Actuaries: Ranked Top Job in US

With support from Autodesk, Cisco, Florida Institute of Technology, iRobot, Johns Hopkins University, L’Oreal, Microsoft, Project Lead the Way, Raytheon, Rhode Island School of Design, Society of Actuaries, Technology Students Association, Texas Instruments, Whitebox Learning, and the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation, Mediaplanet published this educational and informational guide in an effort to inspire and educate readers to become the problem solvers of tomorrow.

Click the image below to read the full report.

Mediaplanet Cover

Why The National STEM Education Fund Is So Important

U.S. SenateFrom the Huffington Post: “One reason for optimism in this area [STEM] involves legislation currently moving through Congress. Included in the bi-partisan Senate immigration reform bill is a national STEM education fund intended to increase the training of students in STEM fields and produce more college graduates in those fields. An amendment to the bill, proposed by Sens. Orrin Hatch (R-UT), Amy Klobuchar (D-MN) and Chris Coons (D-DE) and adopted unanimously by the Senate Judiciary Committee makes this fund even more robust as it provides states with additional money to strengthen their STEM education that prepare students for high-skill jobs.”

Click here to read more about this vital piece of legislation.

International Science and Engineering Fair recognizes 10 Kentucky students

Seventeen high school students made Kentucky proud at the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair last week in Phoenix, Arizona, where more than 1,500 students from 70 countries competed after qualifying at their state or regional science and engineering fair.

Ten of Kentucky’s students brought home at least one award from the event, with a total of 14 awards for Kentucky. Eight students received a “Grand Award” by finishing in the top four of their category. As prizes are given in many awards categories, a total of $9,000 in prize money, two all expense paid trips to CERN in Geneva, Switzerland, and a $60,000 tuition scholarship award were won by the team representing Kentucky.

Lexmark is proud to have sponsored the students who won the Kentucky State Science Fair competition and helped represent Kentucky at the international event.

Here is a photo of the team from Kentucky that attended the fair:

Team Kentucky

Here is a photo of the students who won an award at the fair:

Award Winners
Students in the photo (not in order) are: Valerie Sarge, Karan Babbarwal, Petra Ronald, Richard Gunasena, Sanjana Rane, Aimee Turner, Vincent Cao and Jay Kumar.

Here is the list of students who won an award:

Grand Awards

Second Award of $1,500: Energy and Transportation

Novel Materials for Organic Solar Cells

Valerie Youngmi Sarge, 15, Paul Laurence Dunbar High School, Lexington, Kentucky

Second Award of $1,500: Environmental Sciences

An Inquiry into the Effect of the Environmental Pollutant Acrylic Aldehyde on Neutrophil Activation

Sanjana Jagdish Rane, 15, duPont Manual Magnet High School, Louisville, Kentucky

Third Award of $1,000: Engineering: Materials and Bioengineering

Optimization of Carbon Nanotube-based CFx Primary Battery Performance: Role of Fluorination

Richard Nipun Gunasena, 14, duPont Manual Magnet High School, Louisville, Kentucky

Third Award of $1,000: Environmental Sciences

A Four Year Mathematical Analysis as a Predictor of Dams Impact on Biodiversity and Stream Recovery

Aimee Michelle Turner, 18, Ballard High School, Louisville, Kentucky

Fourth Award of $500: Engineering: Materials and Bioengineering

Studying Bone Matrix Formation via Bioengineering Approach

Karan Babbarwal, 16, duPont Manual Magnet High School, Louisville, Kentucky

Fourth Award of $500: Environmental Management Category

Further Studies in Biofilm Removal of Wastewater Contaminants

Monica Elizabeth McFadden, 18, Notre Dame Academy, Park Hills, Kentucky

Fourth Award of $500: Behavioral and Social Sciences Category

The Effects of the Media on Gender Stereotypes and the Furthering of Sexual Harassment

Petra Katherine Ronald, 17, Paul Laurence Dunbar High School, Lexington, Kentucky

Fourth Award of $500: Physics and Astronomy

Superconductivity Emerging from Diamagnetism and Non-Fermi Liquid Behavior in a New Class of Chalcogenides

Vincent Shian Cao, 17, Paul Laurence Dunbar High School, Lexington, Kentucky

Special Award Recognition

American Physiological Society: Third Award of $500

What Are Mechanims Underlying Nicotine Induced Neutrophil Apoptosis?

Jay Kumar, 17, duPont Manual Magnet High School, Louisville, Kentucky

Endocrine Society: Certificate of Honorable Mention

Analysis of Changes Regarding Insulin Signaling in Response to High Fat Diet and Aging

Trevor James Krolak, 18, Paul Laurence Dunbar High School, Lexington, Kentucky

European Organization for Nuclear Research-CERN: All-expense paid trip to CERN, Geneva, Switzerland

Novel Materials for Organic Solar Cells

Valerie Youngmi Sarge, 15, Paul Laurence Dunbar High School, Lexington, Kentucky

European Organization for Nuclear Research-CERN: All-expense paid trip to CERN, Geneva, Switzerland

Superconductivity Emerging from Diamagnetism and Non-Fermi Liquid Behavior in a New Class of Chalcogenides

Vincent Shian Cao, 17, Paul Laurence Dunbar High School, Lexington, Kentucky

King Abdul-Aziz & his Companions Foundation for Giftedness and Creativity: Fourth Award $1,500

Novel Materials for Organic Solar Cells

Valerie Youngmi Sarge, 15, Paul Laurence Dunbar High School, Lexington, Kentucky

University of the Sciences in Philadelphia: Tuition Scholarship of $15,000 per year for four years

What Are Mechanims Underlying Nicotine Induced Neutrophil Apoptosis?

Jay Kumar, 17, duPont Manual Magnet High School, Louisville, Kentucky

OCTC offers robotics training course to teachers

OCTCOWENSBORO, Ky. (5/14/13) – Area teachers are invited to learn how to incorporate STEM robotics into their classrooms during a professional development program planned for next month at Owensboro Community and Technical College.

K-12 teachers who participate will work in groups to design, build and program robots. Participants will gain technics that can be used with students in the classroom as well as those on robotics teams. Robot kits will be available to participating teachers throughout the school year.

The Discover STEM Professional Development is made possible by a National Science Foundation grant focused on improving STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) education in Kentucky. Sessions will be held from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on June 3 and 4 at the Advanced Technology Center on OCTC’s main campus.

The program is free, but registration is required by May 30. For information or to register, contact OCTC STEM Specialist Jessica Cecil at Jessica.cecil@kctcs.edu.

Episode 20: Aquabots in Simpson County

AquabotsThis June, Simpson County Public Schools will host the Aquabots Summer Camp, which will provide a hands on experience for middle school girls in 7th and 8th grades who are not exposed to the engineering designs, information technology tools, and science concepts related to engineering and technology careers. The goal of the camp is to increase awareness at the career opportunities in the local industries that utilize these skills. Aquabots will introduce the Waterbotics, an underwater curriculum and program disseminated through a National Science Foundation grant.

In this episode of the Innovation Update, Josh talks with camp coordinator Robin Hollingsworth about the camp and why it’s crucial for young students to hone their problem solving skills.

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State to offer free seminar for entrepreneurs May 21

EntrepreneurFrom The Gleaner: “The Kentucky Cabinet for Economic Development will present ‘Kentucky: Here We Grow Business,’ a free seminar for entrepreneurs, next week in Owensboro. The seminar will begin at 9 a.m. next Tuesday, May 21, at the Green River Area Development District office off U.S. 60 along Owensboro’s western outskirts. Part of a 15-stop tour across the state, this event is designed to educate current and prospective small business owners on resources available to help them start, grow and sustain their businesses.”

To read more about the seminar, click here.

VAMPY 2012: Rube Goldbergineering Photos

Innovate Kentucky seeks to engage high-ability middle grades, high school and college students through existing and new WKU programs. One of the ways this will be accomplished is through three seminars offered through the Summer Program for Verbally and Mathematically Precocious Youth (VAMPY) – sustainability, Rube Goldbergineering (now called STEAM Machines) and problem solving. Rube Goldbergineering/STEAM Machines is taught by Nielsen Pereira and debuted in 2012. Here are photos from the class as students designed and tested their Rube Goldberg machines.

VAMPY 2012: Sustainability Photos

Innovate Kentucky seeks to engage high-ability middle grades, high school and college students through existing and new WKU programs. One of the ways this will be accomplished is through three seminars offered through the Summer Program for Verbally and Mathematically Precocious Youth (VAMPY) – sustainability, Rube Goldbergineering (now called STEAM Machines) and problem solving. Sustainability is taught by David Baxter and Jennifer Smith Sheffield and debuted in 2012. Here are photos from the class field trip to farms in Bowling Green: O’Daniel Farms, Need More Acres farm, Western Kentucky University Farm, and River Cottage Farm.

Lasers and robots turn STEM education into STEAM

STEAM MachinesFrom VentureBeat: “The STEAM Carnival is your typical geeked-out carny attraction, with fire, lasers, robots, and LED lights. Just another night at Burning Man or the Maker Faire, right? But this carnival has a mission: To get kids excited about science, technology, engineering, and mathematics — the STEM disciplines that many educators feel are especially critical — as well as art.”

Read more about the STEAM Carnival here.

Episode 19: Pang Hartman with Frogdice

Pang HartmanPang Hartman is the owner, vice president and creative director of Frogdice, an independent game developer founded in 1996. Pang has made it her mission to get more females interested in video games.

In this episode of the Innovation Update, Pang talks with Josh about the challenges of getting girls interested in video games and why finding success in her mission is critical.

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